Recently in Poultry and Game
Tuesday, June 11, 2013

roasted chicken legs with lemon and oregano

Lemon oregano chicken mise en place.

Darlings, I’m going to make it quick. Things are about to go all topsy-turvy (I’m told the manuscript comes back today – gulp), and I want to share this recipe with you. We’ve been making these roasted chicken legs with lemon and oregano for several months now; as soon as the recipe appeared in Bon Appetit magazine, it’s been a staple of our regular weeknight meals. Quick, effortless, delicious, and dare I say, idiot-proof?

Because I get up at 6am and work non-stop (maybe with a running break a few mornings a week) until close of day (or beyond), I sometimes emerge from my desk a little stupid. What I mean by that is it takes me a few hours to shake off the work on my brain, which sometimes impairs my dinner-prep abilities. Have I burned dinner? Yes. Under-seasoned it? You bet. Over-seasoned it? No doubt. Anything that can make my weeknights easier, more streamlined, less frenetic – I’m all for it. And if I’m being totally honest, any dinner that I can “cook” while sipping a glass of wine, is my kind of dinner. Which this chicken dish totally is.

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Wednesday, February 20, 2013

roasted chicken thighs with clementines

roasted chicken with clementines and orange juice

I don’t care what anyone says, but on my bookshelf, Jerusalem has found a permanent spot as a go-to book. With all due respect to Marco Canora, I think some of his criticism (while judging this year’s Piglet contest) of the book was a little, well, I’m not sure what to call it, but I was genuinely surprised by some of his criticism. But then again, some of the criticism of the books being judged struck me as odd. Adam Roberts makes a good point when he says, some people’s garbage is other people’s treasure. Also, I’m pretty sure you can get sumac at Kalustyan’s and it’s so worth having in your spice pantry.

I get it – some of the recipes, should be more specific, and in that, the critique holds valid. Yes, it’s better to say how much salt and pepper in the ingredients if you do give a measure for it later in instructions. I’m not going to challenge that. What I am going to challenge, perhaps, is that the food, in and of itself, is gorgeous, celebratory, lush, full of joy and love, and Canora makes no mention of it. And while the recipes might have used a slightly more thorough edit, the food, in and of itself, is what truly makes this book a treasure.

I approach writing about food on this blog simply: If I see a good recipe, whether it’s something I’ve tested on my own in the kitchen, or cooked from a book, I’m going to share it with you because I feel that the only recipes worth sharing and writing about are the ones you want to shout about from tops of mountains, or in the case of living in New York – buildings. And Roasted Chicken Thighs with Clementines is one such recipe.

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Wednesday, January 30, 2013

duck breast with garam masala

duck breast with garam masala

This might sound unorthodox, but I prefer staying in to going out on Valentine’s Day. Nothing sounds better to me than a quiet dinner at home: starting our dinner off with leisurely cocktails and snacks and progressing to a quiet, delicious meal that involves just the two of us. Frankly, I don’t even mind the clean up after.

Instead of seating schedules and being ushered out of the restaurant because other couples are waiting, we sit as long as we want to, linger over dessert, and talk, all without being asked how we’re enjoying our food. Because, let’s face it, when you’re eating duck breast, cured with garam masala, you’re most certainly enjoying your dinner.

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Monday, November 12, 2012

thanksgiving turkey 101

thanksgiving turkey 101

Making a Thanksgiving turkey doesn’t have to be a difficult event—or a stressful one. Today, my job is to try to take the scary out of the turkey for you. Believe me, the method I will offer you is far more hands-off than something your mother or grandmother has practiced and I’ll explain why it might be better.

I won’t tell you that this is the only method of making a turkey—that’s akin to saying there’s only one way to fry an egg or roast a chicken. But this has been the method that has consistently worked best for me. Also, I find the science behind cooking to be incredibly fascinating. Ask me about latkes, and I’ll manage to talk about them for an hour-though you might be asleep.

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Wednesday, March 28, 2012

deconstructed banh mi

deconstructed banh mi

It has been decided that wherever we happen to move after this apartment, our next home has to be within walking distance to a banh mi shop. I know it sounds like a trivial matter, but believe me – it’s not. Andrew agrees, and adds to it a list of foods that must be nearby and excellent: Thai, Indian (something we sorely lack!), Chinese and so on. Before he finishes, I add in Italian, a wine shop, a place we can get good prosciutto and cheese and oils and bread; oysters and bourbon (though not necessarily together), and root beer floats. There needs to be a good book store. And superlative baklava. These are all very important things. And to satisfy all those requirements, it’s pretty certain that we can’t move out of the neighborhood.

Thankfully, this is a conundrum that isn’t so pressing. Yet. We’ll cross that bridge when we get to it. For now, there’s another book project in the works and a wedding less than three months away.

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Wednesday, October 26, 2011

stir-fried chicken with scallions and oyster mushrooms

Stir-Fried Chicken with Scallions and Oyster Mushrooms

I am not sure that I can do this particular post justice –I’m not good with adulation. That is I’m good at feeling it, but I’m terrible at putting it in words. On paper.

For months now, I’ve been running around telling people to buy Melissa Clark’s new book, Cook This Now. And I always preface it with, “Yes, I know I work for her, and I might seem biased, but, really, trust me – you’re going to want to cook from it all the time.” And then I get the warm smile, “Yeah, we know and love Melissa Clark, but you are kind of biased. You can’t not like her book.” True, I can’t. But not because of you might think.

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